Beatriz Hausner

BHausnerPhotoBeatriz Hausner is the author of several poetry collections, including Enter the Raccoon and Sew Him Up. Her work has been translated into several languages, including Spanish, her mother tongue: La costurera y el muñeco viviente (trans. Julio César Aguilar: Mantis Editores, Mexico, 2012). Hausner’s career as a literary translator has focused on the poetry of César Moro, Olga Orozco, Rosamel del Valle, the poets of the Chilean group Mandrágora, and many others associated with Spanish American surrealism. She has also translated the early fiction of Alvaro Mutis, and most recently, the poetry of Abigael Bohórquez. She has been President of the Literary Translators’ Association of Canada and was one of the founders of the Banff Literary Translation Centre. For several years she was one of the publishers of Quattro Books, where she oversaw the publication of many works of literature in translation. Her poem “Poetic Twin Man” appeared originally in her collection Sew Him Up, and appears now in Diálogos for the first time in a Spanish translation by Marta Rota Nuñez.

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Remembering Gregory Rabassa

Martin Boyd

Gregory Rabassa (1922-2016)

Gregory Rabassa (1922-2016)

The world of literary translation lost one of its most important figures last month with the death of US translator Gregory Rabassa. When the so-called “Latin American boom” brought writers like Gabriel García Márquez, Mario Vargas Llosa and Julio Cortázar to international fame in the 1960s, it was Rabassa whose well-crafted translations brought many of their masterpieces alive in the English language. For Hopscotch, his translation of Cortázar’s Rayuela, one of the first Latin American novels to receive international attention, Rabassa won the US National Book Award for Translation in 1967. However, of all of his translations the most widely read is without doubt One Hundred Years of Solitude, one of the most important literary works of the twentieth century, whose author García Márquez described Rabassa as “the best Latin American writer in the English language.”

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“Nuestra Palabra” Short Story Competition: 13th edition

nuestra palabraEditorial Nuestra Palabra publishers, AMPO, and the Consulates of Spain and Peru in Toronto are pleased to announce and invite the Hispanic community in Canada, and the Hispanic-Canadian community around the world, to participate in the thirteenth annual edition of the “Nuestra Palabra” short story competition, dedicated to promoting the reading and writing of literature in Spanish and the promotion of Spanish-speaking values.

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María Enriqueta Camarillo (1872-1968)

Maria EnriquetaMaría Enriqueta Camarillo was a Mexican poet, short story writer, novelist and Translator who became one of the most important figures of Spanish-American modernism. In the years after the Mexican Revolution, her children’s books became extremely important as school text books in the context of the educational reforms of José Vasconcelos, and her importance in Mexican culture is reflected in the various libraries and schools that bear her name. She was also recognized outside Mexico, as in 1923 her novel El secreto (“The Secret”) won the Academie Francaise literary prize for best Hispanic female novel.

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Cervantes, 400 Years On

Isabel Martínez

miguel-de-cervantesToday marks the 400th anniversary of the death of Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616), whose masterpiece, The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha (1605), is recognized as the first modern novel in Spanish, and a kind of bridge between the medieval and the modern in the evolution of the language. In a recent interview with the journalist Virginia Bautista, the prominent Mexican author Ignacio Padilla, himself a specialist in Cervantes’s work, describes Don Quixote as “the catalyst for the birth of modern Spanish.”

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Agustín F. Cuenca

VenusOne of Mexico’s greatest 19th century poets, Agustín F. Cuenca (1850-1884) was born in Mexico City. In 1868 he founded the Netzahualcoyotl Literary Society (named after the legendary Aztec philosopher king), together with other intellectuals like Manuel Acuña. As a journalist he contributed to the major Mexican publications of his day. He was a writer who was politically associated with the progressive liberal movement of his time, as is reflected not only in his writings as a journalist but also in his literary works. In 1881 he wrote the play “La Cadena de Hierro”, which was staged several times at the Teatro Nacional de México, and is now considered one of the greatest works of Mexican drama. Today Cuenca is considered a poet of the transition from the Romantic to the Modernist period, with a style that was both multi-faceted and experimental.

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“nuestra palabra” Short Story Competition: 12th edition

Cari Caballero, first-place winner in the 11th edition of nuestra palabra

Cari Caballero, first-place winner in the 11th edition of nuestra palabra

Editorial nuestra palabra, AMPO, the Cervantes Institute and the Consulates of Spain and Peru are pleased to announce and invite the Hispanic community in Canada and the Hispanic-Canadian community abroad to participate in the twelfth annual edition of “nuestra palabra” Short Story Competition, aimed at encouraging the reading and writing of Spanish literary works in Canada and the promotion of the literary values of the Spanish-speaking world.

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Manuel Acuña

Manuel AcunaMexican poet Manuel Acuña was born in Coahuila on August 27, 1849 and died in Mexico City on December 6, 1873. He was an important exponent of Mexico’s Romantic movement, and member of a literary circle that included important figures of Mexican literature like Ignacio Manuel Altamirano and Agustín F. Cuenca. Although he took his life at 24, he had an extremely productive literary life and is recognized as a major Mexican literary figure. One of his most outstanding works is “Nocturno”, translated below, which he dedicated to Rosario de la Peña, with whom he had fallen in love and who is believed to be one of the reasons for his suicide.

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Luis Cernuda

Pilgrim

Luis CernudaSpanish poet Luis Cernuda, born in Seville in 1902, was one of the main figures in the so-called “Generation of ’27”, the movement of Spanish poets that also included his friend Federico García Lorca. After Lorca’s murder in 1936 and the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Cernuda began the exile from which he would never return, first in the United Kingdom, then the United States, and finally, Mexico, where he died in 1963. His work is characterized by a style described by many as neo-Romantic, with a focus on the themes of solitude, desire and his personal experience of exile.

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